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  • Writer's pictureSammie Starr

Album Review: To Kill Achilles - Recovery

Scottish post-hardcore / alternative rock band To Kill Achilles release the antithesis of Something to Remember Me By, Recovery.



Throughout the years, many artists have become more content with embracing their honesty within their craft. It isn't enough to just tell a story or artistically express half-truths anymore. Whether that is due to the last few years of pain and tragedy that we have had to look at things through a different lens or that we have become somewhat jaded to looking at the world through rose-colored glasses, bands like To Kill Achilles and many others, have made it a point to side with the world in expressing the hardships of the world and showing them that they are not alone in their struggles.


Recovery is a vivid account of sadness, hope, and the beauty that comes from striving for personal growth and a brighter future. To Kill Achilles has shown a level of growth in their songwriting as well in themselves, embracing what it is to be true to all flaws and that it's okay to be "not okay."

Since their debut album in 2013, Existence, the band has often shouldered the burden of telling stories of mental degradation without any sign of hope beyond the horizon. To Kill Achilles has now turned to the next chapter in the healing process with their latest full-length album. Accepting the good, the bad, and the ugly takes courage, but ultimately it's about self-acceptance and reaching the other side, and with Recovery, To Kill Achilles unburdens all of this and more.


Recovery starts this painful road to acceptance with "I'm an Addict" and "Chemical Counterpart." An aggressive and sad push through the recognition of the harsh truths of addiction, To Kill Achilles holds nothing back and prepares listeners for the onslaught of realities they will share for the duration of the record.


Other moments that stand out in Recovery are "Fifteen Years." A vignette of time that depicts real-life experiences of a protagonist's tough times and how they came out the other side a kinder and better person, this track feels like a theme to a lot of the experiences expressed in Recovery.


This then jumps into "No, Love is a Crime." Infectious in its delivery of bellicose and melodic elements in one experience, it's a major highlight on the record while still maintaining the resonance of forthright lyricism in dealing with relationships.


The hits keep coming with "Rats." An iconic track that tops all the songs on the record, everything about this song hits below the belt in a good way. With sincere lyrics that call out those that advise others to change based on their preferences and values, it's a piece of music that symbolizes what it takes to be vulnerable enough to be yourself regardless of how others see it.

The album closes with finale tracks "The Cave" and "Recovery." Depicting depression and fighting its battles in its rawest form before greeting the last track, cleverly titled "Recovery." This six-minute tune, the album's penultimate step, expresses the degree of hope and optimism that is felt after the strain of having been through so much agony and misery at the beginning of the album. The addition of a saxophone piece adds dimension to an already lovely listening experience, bringing the record to a finish.


Recovery is a vivid account of sadness, hope, and the beauty that comes from striving for personal growth and a brighter future. To Kill Achilles has shown a level of growth in their songwriting as well in themselves, embracing what it is to be true to all flaws and that it's okay to be "not okay." Recovery is essentially hope, and once one discovers that; there is light at the end of the tunnel.



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